Wish Me Luck

Sometimes I feel compelled to do crazy awesome things. In two hours I’ll jump out of an airplane. I believe this is a perfect thing to do after the couple of weeks I’ve been having…
Adios and wish me luck!

Travel Challenge: Food

In response to Ailsa’s challenge this week, please find my photo from Seville, Spain. It’s a replica of La Giralda… made entirely of SUGAR!

That’s an insane amount of azúcar right there!

Okay, now that’s out of the way we can talk about something we might actually eat. Whenever someone asks me what Maryland is known for, I kind of have to respond with two answers: Football & Old Bay.

It’s difficult to explain exactly what eating Old Bay is like. Or to convey the sheer amount used in food locally. It’s a salty mixture of different spices and used primarily on seafood, but I’ve seen it used on french fries. We even use Old Bay to rim our bloody marys around here. See for yourself. It’s kind of a big deal.

This is basically the Holy Grail of Old Bay usage. Crabs steamed with so much Old Bay that it makes your eyes water and your fingers burn.

Old Bay Galore

We even have an Old Bay parking garage

Travel theme: Night

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Here’s my try at this weeks theme posed by Ailsa.

This week, the theme is “Night” and the first thing that came to mind was Seville and the performances we witnessed and the smell of jasmine (one of my absolute favorite scents) which seemed especially strong at night in some places.

I loved this mural. Doesn’t it look like the man and the goat have history together the way the man is eyeing the goat so cautiously?

Inside the building with the mural, we watched a wonderful performance.

We never made it into Metropol Parasol, but they really did look like giant mushrooms.

This spot definitely seemed to be more of a local hangout. Anyone could get up and dance.

Puente de Triana over the Guadalquivir River.

If you also participated in Ailsa’s theme I would love to see what you chose.

BEDA Classes

Hello everyone!

I’ve received my BEDA Group assignment and I’m in Group 6. Who else is with me!? Don’t be shy now.

Also, I received the contact info for the coordinator at the school where I’ll be teaching. I sent her an email to introduce myself and to ask about the age range of my future students. It turns out I’ll be teaching 12 through 17 year-olds! Now, I’ll be honest here. I am pretty nervous about this. I’m much more comfortable teaching people around my age or much older. That’s what I’ve been doing for several years and in a few different places. I’ve always been the young girl with all of the older friends. Or the youngest girl in the office. That sort of thing is natural for me. Understanding children is not, but I am excited about discovering how.

Now, I’ll let you in on a little secret. Children kind of freak me out. Please don’t get me wrong. It’s not that I don’t like children. I just get all super awkward whenever it’s time to interact with them. I’ve always felt a bit of jealousy for the people who can just go right up any child and attach and engage themselves with them. It seems to be a gift. It’s a good thing a bit of nervousness is healthy! Please pay no attention to any future kid-phobia freakout manifestations. I know I can do it. I might just have to work at it harder than most. This will definitely help push me out of my comfort zone; teaching children, a new country, a new language, a new life.

Something funny happened today. I received another Auxiliares de Conversación email today which informed me I was still “admitida.” However, I was asked not to be discouraged since they were making placements from the wait-list which began around application number 1404. The reason I found this a bit humorous is because when I applied I’m pretty sure my application number was 5,000 something. Yep, don’t worry. I won’t be discouraged. I’m super happy BEDA worked out!

If anyone has any tips, tricks, or suggestions on what to expect in this 12 to 17 age group PLEASE feel free to add your input! I’m kind of starting at square one here.

Euro Venture 2011 Pt. II Spain “Try Not to Be an Idiot Foreigner Next Time”

This is a continuation of the story here. It’s been interesting how many details I’ve remembered while writing these posts. Hopefully having them here will be a good way for me to remember the little bits.


After my morning journey to the hostal and jet lag beginning to kick in I found myself completely exhausted. I showered and napped for a while until I couldn’t ignore my stomach and my hunger. I roused myself to make myself Madrid-presentable. Both adapters shot sparks around the room when I tried to plug anything into them. After that, they both seemed to be completely worthless. That’s the last time I buy from that Amazon seller. 


While out wandering the streets, I found myself at a chain called “Casa del Jamón“, or “Mundo del Jamón“, or something like that. The serrano and melon hit the spot, but the waiter raised an eyebrow when I ordered vino tinto AND cafe together. 

“Urr…” It seemed he was looking for a polite way to tell me I was an idiot foreigner. “Just to let you know… Most people prefer to drink their cafe after the meal. It is best that way.”

“Oh, yes, I understand. It’s just I have terrible jet lag right now and I’m afraid I will fall asleep if I do not drink it sooner.”

“I see. Really, it is best after the meal. Are you certain?” 


In the end, I drank my wine and coffee at the same time. 

Don’t worry. I won’t do that again. 

Jamón hanging from the ceilings! I think I like this country.



After I found some replacement chargers for my camera and iPod I headed back to the hostal to wait for my Penpal to arrive. I was nervous. What if this person I’ve known for years is crazy? What if she is totally different from what I imagined? Will we kill each other? Eventually, I heard an Australian accent drifting from the reception area. I shyly opened the door and went out to greet her. 


It was wonderful to finally meet her. I think we were both a little shy around each other at first while we both tried to figure the other out. She told me stories about her weeks of travel before meeting me in Spain. I told her about how I arrived at the hostal. We both shared our excitement about the upcoming program. We are quite different from each other. She seemed straight-to-the-point and bold whereas I believe I tend to be more shy and keep my feelings inside. 


We explored the area around our hostal that night. The streets were absolutely full of people. I remember wondering whether this was a very popular part of the city, but later I realized that people seem to take to the streets everywhere! 


We found some interesting things like giant balls where you were supposed to write your dreams on a sheet of paper and then drop it into a slot in the ball. We also found the Desigual store. Sometimes I wish I could pull off wearing all of their crazy creations…


A nice sentiment, no?






Our first dinner together was entertaining. My friend doesn’t really speak or understand Spanish so I found myself doing the ordering and translating even though my Spanish abilities were pretty horrible. In the end, we ordered and ate about six different delicious offerings of tapas. 



The next morning, we visited the Palacio Real. I wish I could illustrate how beautiful the interior is, but we were not allowed to take any photos. All I have are photos of the outside. 




In the afternoon, we travelled to Casa Patas for our program orientation. The “Anglos” enjoyed a flamenco show, paella, and the company of the people they would be spending most of their next eight days and nights with. The newcomers and program veterans all spoke excitedly about what was to come. The next morning we would all file onto a bus for a four-hour trip to La Alberca. 

Travel Theme: Art

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Here’s my response to this weeks challenge created by Alisa.

It took me a while to decide which of my photos represented art to me. I feel like I saw so many wonderful pieces of art while I was in Europe and I couldn’t figure out which to choose!

In the end, I chose a few photos of street art in Paris. They aren’t exactly something you would find in the Louvre or Musée d’Orsay, but I think they capture a beauty and whimsy of their own. Some are downright creepy, but others made me smile instantly. These street pieces all evoked some sort of emotion or thought from me.

Let’s see something that you believe best describes art and why!

Stuff like this was everywhere!

I would love a spaceship and giant bandage on the side of my house.

I had to add this one for the creepy factor.

How cool is this?